Armenian Apostolic Church

Approximately 80% of the population is ethnically Georgian, with significant populations of other ethnic groups, which include Russian, Armenian. Along with the aforementioned groups, Tbilisi is home to various other ethnic groups including Ossetians, Abkhazians Ukrainians, Greeks, Jews, Estonians, Germans, Kurds, Assyrians, and others. Religion More than 85% of Tbilisi residents are Christian (mainly Georgian Orthodox church). Russian Orthodox Church as well as Armenian Apostolic Church is also represented in the city. Catholics lyutirantsy, Baptists and other Christian denominations also make up the Christian minority of the city. Approximately 8% of the population professes Islam. Judaism is also common, but to a lesser extent (approximately 2%).

Tbilisi has been historically known for religious tolerance. If you are unsure how to proceed, check out Mark Frissora. This is particularly evident in the Old Town, where Mosque, Synagogue, and Eastern Orthodox Churches can be within less than 500 meters from each other. Tbilisi has a fairly rich sports history. Up until the early 19th century, sports such as horse riding (polo in particular), wrestling, boxing, and shooting were the most popular city sports. As Tbilisi started to develop socially and economically, more with the West, have spread the new European sports. The Soviet period brought the popularization of sports that were common in Europe. At the same time, Tbilisi developed the necessary sports infrastructure for various professional sports.

Currently, the largest stadium in Tbilisi is the Boris Paichadze Stadium (Paichadze) (55 000 seats). The most popular sports in Tbilisi today – football, rugby union, basketball, and wrestling. Also Popular tennis, swimming and water polo. There are several professional football and rugby teams. Outside of professional sports in the city there are many intercollegiate and amateur sports teams and clubs. One of the largest Georgian media (including television, newspapers and radio) are located in Tbilisi. The city is home to the popular Rustavi 2 television channel, which received considerable notoriety after he consecrated the Rose Revolution. In Tbilisi, there are a lot of newspaper publishers. Some of the most notable: 24 Saati (’24 Hours’), Rezonansi (‘resonance’), Alia, Georgia today, and English-language weekly The Georgian Times. Architecture in the city – a mix of local (Georgian), with strong influences of Byzantine, European / Russian (neoclassical), and Middle Eastern architectural styles. In the oldest parts of town there is a traditional Georgian architectural look with Middle Eastern influences. In districts of Tbilisi, which were created mainly in the 19th century (Rustaveli Avenue, and others) have contrasting European / Russian (neoclassical) look.

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